Set number of days to be displayed
100 days:
365 days:
All:
Reports received after 2018-06-03 (last 45 days).

Positions

Last report position from station Pepper

Date: 2018-06-15 12:20
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 15º 55.05'N:088º 37.76'W
Course: 249º Speed: 5.90 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM2-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185.0
Date: 2018-06-14 00:16
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 16º 30.50'N:088º 21.82'W
Course: 256º Speed: 0.00 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM2-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185.0
Date: 2018-06-13 23:47
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 16º 30.50'N:088º 21.82'W
Course: 301º Speed: 0.00 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM2-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185.0
Date: 2018-06-13 23:29
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 16º 30.50'N:088º 21.81'W
Course: 214º Speed: 0.00 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM2-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185.0
Date: 2018-06-11 16:19
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 16º 49.01'N:088º 05.08'W
Course: 010º Speed: 0.10 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM2-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185.0
Date: 2018-06-10 18:50
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 16º 53.17'N:088º 07.35'W
Course: 357º Speed: 0.00 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM2-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185.0
Date: 2018-06-10 18:50
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 16º 53.17'N:088º 07.35'W
Course: 357º Speed: 0.00 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM1-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/10450
Date: 2018-06-10 18:19
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 16º 53.17'N:088º 07.35'W
Course: 233º Speed: 0.00 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM2-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185.0
Date: 2018-06-10 15:03
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 17º 07.92'N:088º 04.86'W
Course: 167º Speed: 0.10 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM2-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185.0
Date: 2018-06-10 15:03
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 17º 07.92'N:088º 04.86'W
Course: 167º Speed: 0.10 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM1-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/10450
Date: 2018-06-10 15:02
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 17º 44.77'N:088º 01.81'W
Course: 167º Speed: 0.10 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM2-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185.0
Date: 2018-06-10 15:02
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 17º 44.77'N:088º 01.81'W
Course: 167º Speed: 0.10 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM1-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/10450
Date: 2018-06-08 13:54
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 17º 44.76'N:088º 01.82'W
Course: 195º Speed: 0.10 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM2-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185.0
Date: 2018-06-08 13:54
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 17º 44.76'N:088º 01.82'W
Course: 195º Speed: 0.10 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM1-1 with pactor4/FBB-2/10450
Date: 2018-06-07 15:59
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 20º 31.04'N:086º 56.85'W
Course: 040º Speed: 0.00 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM1-2 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185
Date: 2018-06-07 15:59
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 20º 31.04'N:086º 56.85'W
Course: 040º Speed: 0.00 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM1-2 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185
Date: 2018-06-07 15:59
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 20º 31.04'N:086º 56.85'W
Course: 040º Speed: 0.00 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM1-2 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185
Date: 2018-06-07 15:59
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 17º 54.81'N:087º 57.78'W
Course: 237º Speed: 0.10 knots
Received via: Panama SailMail - HPPM1-2 with pactor4/FBB-2/8185

Position Tracking & Reporting Service for
YachtCom and SailCom customers.

Tracking Red Reported positions. Red Last reported position is in centre of map.

Google Maps JavaScript API v3 Example: Common Loader


Reports



Date: 2018-06-14 00:16
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 16º 30.50'N:088º 21.82'W
Author: Hatty
Location: Belize
Title: 13 June


Well we've checked out of Belize. We used Placencia because the anchorage has good protection. The whole trip took 2 hours and around 48 pounds. We took the water taxi because yachts aren't allowed up the creek. Yesterday we stayed in a super brand new marina in Sapodilla
Reserve, great facilities, bar, restaurant, laundry room and wifif all around the marina. Also easily buoyed to enter with plenty of deep water. We met a lovely family Marianna, Barney and their cute 4 year old daughter Myria. They are starting out learning to sail and live in Belize city. She's
from Moldova and he is from Hungary! Fabulous mix. I hope we meet again. We sailed an average of 8 knots from Sapodilla to Placencia. As the reputation stands Belize sailing has fabulous wind on the beam and flat seas thanks to the reef which runs along the coast. It took a couple
of hours to do 17nms. Wish it was like that every sail.

Placencia is nice. Great restaurants with typical Belize menu: Cows foot soup, fry jacks and Spanish type foods. We ate in a local restaurant called Wendy's twice which was superb produce and well put together. No complaints there. We caught up with Marianna and Barney, Jane and
Jim on Adventure (they live in Guatemala and Jane went to Godolphin in Salisbury-the same school the girls went to). And our Alabama friends. We feel as though we are catching up with other sailors more as we are closer to the hurricane hole in Rio Dolce.

Tomorrow we will leave early for 47 nms to Guatemala anchorage to wait for the highest tide the next day at 0830 before entering the river Rio Dolce. To enter the river you need to cross a sand bar which is as low as 1.8m.. We draw 1.7m. The sand is forever shifting so shallows could be
less than 1.8m. This is why we have picked 15 June at 0830. It's the highest tide for the month at .70m which should give us a safe passage across. Luckily the difficult section is 200m and the locals are at hand to help; at a price of course. The general procedures are to try to free
yourself, wait for higher tide (we plan to cross at 0730 .66m high tide which would give us an extra lift should we run aground), or tilt the boat by attaching a halyard to another vessel and they pull you over lifting the keel. I'm sure we will be fine and I will record our crossing in. Booking in
will be with an agent Raul. He comes highly recommended and can arrange for 6 months without difficulties. After checking in we have a 7 nm passage along the river through a high;y steeped canyon with beautiful green tropical jungle trees either side with monkeys too. The river which
translates as Sweet Water is fresh as it runs off the hills. Although brackish waters manatees live here which we are looking forward to seeing. The river opens up into a huge lake which is where we will stay for the hurricane season. All around the lake are various ancorages and marinas,
we have chosen RAM because of its' excellent reputation and of course a lift. We'll lift Pepper out 25th June and carry out our million jobs. The labour is much more affordable and it is wise to take full advantage of this. As you can imagine our 'To do' list is growing.

Date: 2018-06-14 00:16
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 16º 30.50'N:088º 21.82'W
Author: Hatty
Location: Belize
Title: 13 June


Well we've checked out of Belize. We used Placencia because the anchorage has good protection. The whole trip took 2 hours and around 48 pounds. We took the water taxi because yachts aren't allowed up the creek. Yesterday we stayed in a super brand new marina in Sapodilla
Reserve, great facilities, bar, restaurant, laundry room and wifif all around the marina. Also easily buoyed to enter with plenty of deep water. We met a lovely family Marianna, Barney and their cute 4 year old daughter Myria. They are starting out learning to sail and live in Belize city. She's
from Moldova and he is from Hungary! Fabulous mix. I hope we meet again. We sailed an average of 8 knots from Sapodilla to Placencia. As the reputation stands Belize sailing has fabulous wind on the beam and flat seas thanks to the reef which runs along the coast. It took a couple
of hours to do 17nms. Wish it was like that every sail.

Placencia is nice. Great restaurants with typical Belize menu: Cows foot soup, fry jacks and Spanish type foods. We ate in a local restaurant called Wendy's twice which was superb produce and well put together. No complaints there. We caught up with Marianna and Barney, Jane and
Jim on Adventure (they live in Guatemala and Jane went to Godolphin in Salisbury-the same school the girls went to). And our Alabama friends. We feel as though we are catching up with other sailors more as we are closer to the hurricane hole in Rio Dolce.

Tomorrow we will leave early for 47 nms to Guatemala anchorage to wait for the highest tide the next day at 0830 before entering the river Rio Dolce. To enter the river you need to cross a sand bar which is as low as 1.8m.. We draw 1.7m. The sand is forever shifting so shallows could be
less than 1.8m. This is why we have picked 15 June at 0830. It's the highest tide for the month at .70m which should give us a safe passage across. Luckily the difficult section is 200m and the locals are at hand to help; at a price of course. The general procedures are to try to free
yourself, wait for higher tide (we plan to cross at 0730 .66m high tide which would give us an extra lift should we run aground), or tilt the boat by attaching a halyard to another vessel and they pull you over lifting the keel. I'm sure we will be fine and I will record our crossing in. Booking in
will be with an agent Raul. He comes highly recommended and can arrange for 6 months without difficulties. After checking in we have a 7 nm passage along the river through a high;y steeped canyon with beautiful green tropical jungle trees either side with monkeys too. The river which
translates as Sweet Water is fresh as it runs off the hills. Although brackish waters manatees live here which we are looking forward to seeing. The river opens up into a huge lake which is where we will stay for the hurricane season. All around the lake are various ancorages and marinas,
we have chosen RAM because of its' excellent reputation and of course a lift. We'll lift Pepper out 25th June and carry out our million jobs. The labour is much more affordable and it is wise to take full advantage of this. As you can imagine our 'To do' list is growing.

Date: 2018-06-10 18:50
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 16º 53.17'N:088º 07.35'W
Author: Hatty
Location: Belize
Title: 6-10 June Cozumel, Mexio to San Pedro, Belize


Arriving in San Pedro, Belize: Two night sails and one day; 30 hrs of rough rolly sailing. Running along the length of Belize is the second largest reef in the world. On the ocean side is 800m+ deep ocean, on the inside nothing much below 12m. The reef takes all the energy from the
waves so inside the reef is calm waters but there's always the wind to keep you sailing and generally an easterly wind so it's on the beam-a comfortable sail. We were checking in Belize at a town called San Pedro which has a cut in the reef so you can get access to the mainland. Going
through the cut of the reef was incredibly tight with a dog leg which made motoring from a rolly windy sea into calmer shallow waters very nerve racking. The depth guage read 0 a few times. The colour of the sea is stunning. Bright blue and gin clear. Seeing the bottom was easy. We
didn't enjoy San Pedro. It was grotty and we were conned by a taxi driver who said he said 35 dollars both ways when at the beginning he said 25 dollars! Sometimes it's just not worth arguing, But he gave us a bad first impression. Customs and immigration was straight forward. In the
centre of town upstairs form the Scotia Bank opposite the airport not as indicated in the pilot book. The port office, a shack, was a taxi ride away on a pot holed dirt track with rubbish everywhere. We didn't hang around long and headed for Caulker Caye. It's very tendy, young, colourful,
quaint, fun with lots to see and do; even managed a yoga session here. A few other yachts were anchored here, Irish and American. After a day in Caulker we headed off to St George's Cay which had a British army R&R camp 70-90s; we thought this would be interesting to see. On the
way to this Cay we needed to pass Port Stuck which is a shallow area between Hicks Cay and Montejo Cay. The pass isn't marked although a few sticks were dotted around giving no indication which side to pass. A long story short, we ran aground 'briefly'. We knew it would be a tough
section, navionics is useless in parts too, so planned to pass through mid rising tide (high tide was only 16cm), we were fairly confident with the drills. 15 minutes getting through the pass a 35 knot gusting Force 8 squall came through-great timing! Wouldn't have been fun having that along
with running aground. We enjoyed St George's, took loads of photos of the army accommodation and had a chat in the bar with the owner of the resort who had lived there since 1930s. Heard some great stories. Next stop was Colson Cay, nothing exciting here, no life but quiet and
pretty. We saw a huge dead turtle who had become trapped by a rope attached to a fish trap. Very sad to see. The weather has been frustrating. We've taken shelter today over lunch in Coco Plum Cay. Too windy to go ashore. It started off beautifully but the squalls come in big and
fast. Unfortunately we are not seeing Belize in its' best light. We're deciding wether to stay in a marina on the mainland or ride this squall out...tbc

Date: 2018-06-10 18:50
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 16º 53.17'N:088º 07.35'W
Author: Hatty
Location: Belize
Title: 6-10 June Cozumel, Mexio to San Pedro, Belize


Arriving in San Pedro, Belize: Two night sails and one day; 30 hrs of rough rolly sailing. Running along the length of Belize is the second largest reef in the world. On the ocean side is 800m+ deep ocean, on the inside nothing much below 12m. The reef takes all the energy from the
waves so inside the reef is calm waters but there's always the wind to keep you sailing and generally an easterly wind so it's on the beam-a comfortable sail. We were checking in Belize at a town called San Pedro which has a cut in the reef so you can get access to the mainland. Going
through the cut of the reef was incredibly tight with a dog leg which made motoring from a rolly windy sea into calmer shallow waters very nerve racking. The depth guage read 0 a few times. The colour of the sea is stunning. Bright blue and gin clear. Seeing the bottom was easy. We
didn't enjoy San Pedro. It was grotty and we were conned by a taxi driver who said he said 35 dollars both ways when at the beginning he said 25 dollars! Sometimes it's just not worth arguing, But he gave us a bad first impression. Customs and immigration was straight forward. In the
centre of town upstairs form the Scotia Bank opposite the airport not as indicated in the pilot book. The port office, a shack, was a taxi ride away on a pot holed dirt track with rubbish everywhere. We didn't hang around long and headed for Caulker Caye. It's very tendy, young, colourful,
quaint, fun with lots to see and do; even managed a yoga session here. A few other yachts were anchored here, Irish and American. After a day in Caulker we headed off to St George's Cay which had a British army R&R camp 70-90s; we thought this would be interesting to see. On the
way to this Cay we needed to pass Port Stuck which is a shallow area between Hicks Cay and Montejo Cay. The pass isn't marked although a few sticks were dotted around giving no indication which side to pass. A long story short, we ran aground 'briefly'. We knew it would be a tough
section, navionics is useless in parts too, so planned to pass through mid rising tide (high tide was only 16cm), we were fairly confident with the drills. 15 minutes getting through the pass a 35 knot gusting Force 8 squall came through-great timing! Wouldn't have been fun having that along
with running aground. We enjoyed St George's, took loads of photos of the army accommodation and had a chat in the bar with the owner of the resort who had lived there since 1930s. Heard some great stories. Next stop was Colson Cay, nothing exciting here, no life but quiet and
pretty. We saw a huge dead turtle who had become trapped by a rope attached to a fish trap. Very sad to see. The weather has been frustrating. We've taken shelter today over lunch in Coco Plum Cay. Too windy to go ashore. It started off beautifully but the squalls come in big and
fast. Unfortunately we are not seeing Belize in its' best light. We're deciding wether to stay in a marina on the mainland or ride this squall out...tbc

Date: 2018-06-10 18:50
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 16º 53.17'N:088º 07.35'W
Author: Hatty
Location: Belize
Title: 6-10 June Cozumel, Mexio to San Pedro, Belize


Arriving in San Pedro, Belize: Two night sails and one day; 30 hrs of rough rolly sailing. Running along the length of Belize is the second largest reef in the world. On the ocean side is 800m+ deep ocean, on the inside nothing much below 12m. The reef takes all the energy from the
waves so inside the reef is calm waters but there's always the wind to keep you sailing and generally an easterly wind so it's on the beam-a comfortable sail. We were checking in Belize at a town called San Pedro which has a cut in the reef so you can get access to the mainland. Going
through the cut of the reef was incredibly tight with a dog leg which made motoring from a rolly windy sea into calmer shallow waters very nerve racking. The depth guage read 0 a few times. The colour of the sea is stunning. Bright blue and gin clear. Seeing the bottom was easy. We
didn't enjoy San Pedro. It was grotty and we were conned by a taxi driver who said he said 35 dollars both ways when at the beginning he said 25 dollars! Sometimes it's just not worth arguing, But he gave us a bad first impression. Customs and immigration was straight forward. In the
centre of town upstairs form the Scotia Bank opposite the airport not as indicated in the pilot book. The port office, a shack, was a taxi ride away on a pot holed dirt track with rubbish everywhere. We didn't hang around long and headed for Caulker Caye. It's very tendy, young, colourful,
quaint, fun with lots to see and do; even managed a yoga session here. A few other yachts were anchored here, Irish and American. After a day in Caulker we headed off to St George's Cay which had a British army R&R camp 70-90s; we thought this would be interesting to see. On the
way to this Cay we needed to pass Port Stuck which is a shallow area between Hicks Cay and Montejo Cay. The pass isn't marked although a few sticks were dotted around giving no indication which side to pass. A long story short, we ran aground 'briefly'. We knew it would be a tough
section, navionics is useless in parts too, so planned to pass through mid rising tide (high tide was only 16cm), we were fairly confident with the drills. 15 minutes getting through the pass a 35 knot gusting Force 8 squall came through-great timing! Wouldn't have been fun having that along
with running aground. We enjoyed St George's, took loads of photos of the army accommodation and had a chat in the bar with the owner of the resort who had lived there since 1930s. Heard some great stories. Next stop was Colson Cay, nothing exciting here, no life but quiet and
pretty. We saw a huge dead turtle who had become trapped by a rope attached to a fish trap. Very sad to see. The weather has been frustrating. We've taken shelter today over lunch in Coco Plum Cay. Too windy to go ashore. It started off beautifully but the squalls come in big and
fast. Unfortunately we are not seeing Belize in its' best light. We're deciding wether to stay in a marina on the mainland or ride this squall out...tbc

Date: 2018-06-10 18:50
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 16º 53.17'N:088º 07.35'W
Author: Hatty
Location: Belize
Title: 6-10 June Cozumel, Mexio to San Pedro, Belize


Arriving in San Pedro, Belize: Two night sails and one day; 30 hrs of rough rolly sailing. Running along the length of Belize is the second largest reef in the world. On the ocean side is 800m+ deep ocean, on the inside nothing much below 12m. The reef takes all the energy from the
waves so inside the reef is calm waters but there's always the wind to keep you sailing and generally an easterly wind so it's on the beam-a comfortable sail. We were checking in Belize at a town called San Pedro which has a cut in the reef so you can get access to the mainland. Going
through the cut of the reef was incredibly tight with a dog leg which made motoring from a rolly windy sea into calmer shallow waters very nerve racking. The depth guage read 0 a few times. The colour of the sea is stunning. Bright blue and gin clear. Seeing the bottom was easy. We
didn't enjoy San Pedro. It was grotty and we were conned by a taxi driver who said he said 35 dollars both ways when at the beginning he said 25 dollars! Sometimes it's just not worth arguing, But he gave us a bad first impression. Customs and immigration was straight forward. In the
centre of town upstairs form the Scotia Bank opposite the airport not as indicated in the pilot book. The port office, a shack, was a taxi ride away on a pot holed dirt track with rubbish everywhere. We didn't hang around long and headed for Caulker Caye. It's very tendy, young, colourful,
quaint, fun with lots to see and do; even managed a yoga session here. A few other yachts were anchored here, Irish and American. After a day in Caulker we headed off to St George's Cay which had a British army R&R camp 70-90s; we thought this would be interesting to see. On the
way to this Cay we needed to pass Port Stuck which is a shallow area between Hicks Cay and Montejo Cay. The pass isn't marked although a few sticks were dotted around giving no indication which side to pass. A long story short, we ran aground 'briefly'. We knew it would be a tough
section, navionics is useless in parts too, so planned to pass through mid rising tide (high tide was only 16cm), we were fairly confident with the drills. 15 minutes getting through the pass a 35 knot gusting Force 8 squall came through-great timing! Wouldn't have been fun having that along
with running aground. We enjoyed St George's, took loads of photos of the army accommodation and had a chat in the bar with the owner of the resort who had lived there since 1930s. Heard some great stories. Next stop was Colson Cay, nothing exciting here, no life but quiet and
pretty. We saw a huge dead turtle who had become trapped by a rope attached to a fish trap. Very sad to see. The weather has been frustrating. We've taken shelter today over lunch in Coco Plum Cay. Too windy to go ashore. It started off beautifully but the squalls come in big and
fast. Unfortunately we are not seeing Belize in its' best light. We're deciding wether to stay in a marina on the mainland or ride this squall out...tbc

Date: 2018-06-07 15:59
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 20º 31.04'N:086º 56.85'W
Author: Hatty
Location: Mexico
Title: Cozumel 3 June


We decided to check out of Cozumel. It's 150 dollars less to pay than in El Cid.
We spent the weekend in El Cid using our food and beer tokens, taking full advantage of the gym and yoga classes. No wind and very hot in the marina. We hired a car and went to visit Chichen Itza-a Mayan temple really interesting. The Mayans designed a calendar which is far more
superior than the one we use today. We did a big food shop and saw the organic health food store that I had been ordering from in Isla Mujeres. Isla Mujeres is great it's bohemian, back packers, vegan restaurants, yoga retreats etc.

Cozumel was fun, we saw a mock demonstration of the traditional ball game pok-a-tok. two sides passing a solid rubber ball using their hips. There are hoops on the sides of the walls where you would win should you put the ball through the hoop. We saw these huge stadiums when in
Chichen Itza so it was good to see how they played in real life. It's a brutal game and they conducted human sacrifices BC.

Date: 2018-06-07 15:59
Station ID: Pepper
Position: 20º 31.04'N:086º 56.85'W
Author: Hatty
Location: Mexico
Title: Cozumel 3 June


We decided to check out of Cozumel. It's 150 dollars less to pay than in El Cid.
We spent the weekend in El Cid using our food and beer tokens, taking full advantage of the gym and yoga classes. No wind and very hot in the marina. We hired a car and went to visit Chichen Itza-a Mayan temple really interesting. The Mayans designed a calendar which is far more
superior than the one we use today. We did a big food shop and saw the organic health food store that I had been ordering from in Isla Mujeres. Isla Mujeres is great it's bohemian, back packers, vegan restaurants, yoga retreats etc.

Cozumel was fun, we saw a mock demonstration of the traditional ball game pok-a-tok. two sides passing a solid rubber ball using their hips. There are hoops on the sides of the walls where you would win should you put the ball through the hoop. We saw these huge stadiums when in
Chichen Itza so it was good to see how they played in real life. It's a brutal game and they conducted human sacrifices BC.


Click here to show all stations

Sailing The Airwaves


Thinking of satillite communications
Then look at the Iridium GO Marine from SailCom Marine.
off-shore Email account
http://www.sailcom.co.uk/go

How to get in touch:

Phone: 01489 565100
Overseas: 00 44 1489 565 100
Leave us a message - click here!
Send email - click here!

Training

GMDSS Radio
RYA Radar

GMDSS

Equipment

SSB Radios
Pactor modems

GM800

Information

Legal Requirements
Installation

Information

Tracking

Position Reportingl
Blogs

Radar